Wednesday, 22 October 2008

BBC TRUST OVERSIGHT.

BBC TRUST OVERSIGHT.

BBC TRUST OVERSIGHT is so open to abuse we cannot believe they have missed it.
The BBC Trust is usually so articulate in every fine detail then surely this has to be classed as one big oversight?
Below you can read part of a particular section on "Who needs a T.V. licence?"

Who needs a TV licence?(BBC Trust help files)

If you watch or record television programmes as they're being shown on TV, you need a TV licence

* You need a TV licence to use any television receiving equipment such as a television set, digital box, DVD or video recorder, PC, laptop or mobile phone to watch or record television programmes as they're being shown on TV.
* If you are only watching on-demand services, after programmes have already been broadcast (e.g. BBC iPlayer), you will not need a TV licence
* 98% of UK homes have a TV
* People aged 75 or over can apply for a free TV licence
* People who are registered blind or severely sight impaired quality for a 50% concession on the cost of a TV licence
* People living in residential care under certain conditions may qualify for a concessionary TV licence of £7.50 a year
**************
The section that reads;
If you are only watching on-demand services, after programmes have already been broadcast (e.g. BBC iPlayer), you will not need a TV licence
this simple phrase conjures up all sorts of problems for those attempting to enforce laws on licence fee dodgers and it is difficult to make any sense of it.
There is software out there at the moment that can record anything that can be shown on ANY screen and to seperate this from normal recording is fanciful and can be played upon in all sort of ways; for example, hand - helds, mobiles, notebooks, PC's. As most PC's today have T.V. cards already fitted if you want the all singing - all dancing version this would mean only a percentage of PC owners would be paying a T.V. licence for their PC - is this a can of worms or what?
The last T.V. licence I read suggested you only need receiving equipment to be liable for a T.V. licence fee - the staus quo has been changed? Surely it's not because from next year onward we will have the overwhelming choice of T.V. channels from Europe? which we can expect to pick up first on our mobile phones!
The word ambiguous jumps to mind as part of the suggestion says, quote;
If you are only watching on-demand services, after programmes have already been broadcast (e.g. BBC iPlayer), you will not need a TV licence
and yet a simple monitor may have no PC card or T.V. connection it still has the ability to accept and receive T.V. signals which in fact automatically rules out the above phrase;
If you are only watching on-demand services, after programmes have already been broadcast (e.g. BBC iPlayer), you will not need a TV licence
The BBC Trust needs to review this section as they have now given the licence fee dodger another hundred and one excuses not to pay their licence fee.
Is it news to you ? then you read it here first!

2 comments:

austin316gb said...

I can see why they have had to put this clause in. Every morning I have to drive past a massive billboard with the Nokia N96 emblazoned all over it. And the focus of this particular advert? The fact it has the BBC iPlayer built in.

If the trust hadn't put this clause in then I would imagine that would leave some ambiguity as to if a person with an N96 and no other equipment in there home would have to have a TV license (Unlikely I know). It may also have to do with enforcing the license. Would the TV licensing van have the power to ask to see your mobile phone as your walking down the street?

You should also remember that all retailers, such as Comet and Curries, are obliged to forward details of every customer buying a television to the TV license people who check the address has a license. Why should these retailers be forced into this extra hassle if, say, Carphone Warehouse doesn't have to forward the details of all those who buy an N96.

I can also see this feature becoming more and more prevalent on new mobiles making it even harder to enforce

Domain Holdings. said...

austin316gb, thank you for your comprehensive thoughts.
We had thought on similar lines and thought having the directive;
You need a TV licence to use any television receiving equipment such as a television set, digital box, DVD or video recorder, PC, laptop or mobile phone to watch or record television programmes as they're being shown on TV.
*******
followed by the comment;
If you are only watching on-demand services, after programmes have already been broadcast (e.g. BBC iPlayer), you will not need a TV licence,
*******
IE; first the directive telling you some of the possible equipment(including mobiles), then the suggestion you can watch the iPlayer without a licence, we would like to know what other bit of equipment can receive T.V., so we consider this needs clarification.
The twenty six countries who have shown interest in the NEW European licence for T.V. channels on the internet must also be factored in.
The prerequisite for these licences is that each country wishing a licence must be able to spot beam at least 40% of Europe and be able to cover their own country by a 60% beam, so times are changing big time.